Water meter readings

Water meter readings

From the City of Cape Town:

Your home or business is connected to the City’s water network through a water meter, which usually sits in a small chamber under the pavement outside your property. We read your water meter once a month to calculate your monthly water and sewerage use.

How the City reads your water meter

The meter is read by a different person each month. We take a meter reading using a handheld computer terminal that contains core information about the property, such as the erf number and the address.

If we cannot read your meter (due to your gate being locked or other circumstances) and you do not submit your water reading, your bill will be an estimate based on your previous water use. All cost estimates will be reversed, if necessary, when we get an actual reading.

DID YOU KNOW?Well-run City: Each year, we replace about 9 000 old or malfunctioning water meters. 

You can help us get an accurate reading for your water meter by doing the following:

  • Make sure you know where your water meter is located.
  • Make sure it is not obstructed (e.g. by sand or weeds) and is easy to read.
  • Your water meter should be accessible to City officials at all times.
  • If your water meter is behind locked gates, or if dogs prevent the meter readers from taking a reading, you can submit the reading yourself (see below).
  • Alternatively, ask the City to relocate your meter to the outside of your house, via the City’s Service Requests application.

How to read your water meter

You can submit your water meter reading by calling 0860 103 089 or entering it online via your municipal account on our e-Services portal.

No matter the type of water meter, black numbers represent kilolitres and red numbers represent litres. As you are charged per kilolitre, only supply the black numbers when submitting your reading.

DID YOU KNOW?

Inclusive City: The City has installed free-call phones at some City facilities to allow you to make enquiries and request services at no cost.

Water and sanitation tariffs

All formal properties have water meters, which we use to read your water consumption and calculate your monthly bill. However, there are different tariffs for residences, businesses, and other organisations.

  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation in your home
  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation for your business or organisation

Report problems with your water meter

If your water meter is not being read regularly, is malfunctioning or needs to be relocated to outside of your property, please contact the City’s 24-hour call centre:

  • Call us on 0860 103 089 (choose option 2: water-related faults)
  • SMS: 31373 (max of 160 characters)
  • Whatsapp: 063 407 3699
  • Email: water@capetown.gov.za

You can also go to our service requests portal and report or request an issue online. If you need some help with how to place a service request or report an issue, please see Submit a service request.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Red@Beau Constantia

Red@Beau Constantia

RED @ BEAU is a dedicated event to launch the Reddam Sports Foundation; A foundation that is committed to giving deserving students the opportunity to attend Reddam House – a fitting sentiment in that Reddam is Latin for “give back”.

In order to raise funds for the Reddam Sports Foundation, we have lined up two of the hottest acts in South Africa: LOCNVILLE and Freshlyground, to perform at Beau Constantia.

Our dress code for the day is strictly casual, with a splash of red…

If you are going to join us for RED @ BEAU, please remember the following:
• Cash, should you wish to purchase something from our Food Trucks, or drinks from our bar setups
• Blankets, as it can get chilly at night

** Please note; in the interest of responsible alcohol use and your own safety, we encourage you to make use of an UBER or taxi, rather than driving through. The estate will be CLOSED to vehicular traffic on the day, with limited parking available at Constantia Nek.

Tickets are available from Webtickets at R350.00 for pupils and R500.00 for adults.

Date: 24 February 2018

Time:  5 PM – 10 PM

Venue: Beau Constantia, Constantia Main Road, Constantia.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Take up the #AtoBChallenge

Take up the #AtoBChallenge

Join the #AtoBChallenge Bike Bus and cycle to Open Streets Main Road on the 25th February. Participants stand a chance to win a bicycle!

This year Open Streets Cape Town and Bicycle South have teamed up to activate a series of bicycle commuter routes around Cape Town. Aimed to encourage more people to go by bike and experience new ways of moving around the city, the #AtoBChallenge kicks off with a Bike Bus (group cycle) to Open Streets Main Road.

The Bike bus will start from Muizenberg and make its way Open Streets Main Road via Main Road, there will be various pick up points along the way. We encourage participants to arrive half an hour before indicated departure times, so that we can leave on time. Pickup points include:

1. Muizenberg – Knead Bakery, departing at 9:00 am
2. Tokai – Bootleggers, departing at 9:30 am
3. Wynberg – Four & Twenty, departing at 10:00 am
4. Claremont – Knead Palmyra Centre, departing at 10:15 am
5. Mowbray – The Gear Change, departing at 10:45 am
6. OS Main Road – arriving at 11:00 am
7. Single return trip (OS Main Road to Muizenberg) at 1:00 pm

WHAT YOU NEED TO BRING
✓ A bike in working order (take it to the bike shop for a check up if it hasn’t been ridden lately).
✓ Helmet
✓ Water
✓ A lock to secure your bike at your destination
✓ A pump + tube/repair kit
✓ A sense of fun and some friends too

* Please note that you are responsible for your own safety while riding with the group, however one of the best things about the bike bus is safety in numbers – the more people who ride together, the higher the visibility the bike bus has.

HOW TO ENTER THE #ATOBCHALLENGE AND STAND A CHANCE TO WIN A BIKE!

You will need to follow these steps:
1. Take a picture of yourself commuting to Open Streets Main Road on the 25 Feb on your chosen mode of transport (a video is even better!)
2. Post your picture on social media with the hashtag #AtoBChallenge and tag @OpenStreetsCT (Twitter) or @OpenStreetsCapeTown (Facebook, Instagram)
3. Share your feedback when you get to Open Streets Main Road. Open Streets Cape Town will be waiting for you with a little present at the Open Streets info booth opposite Aberdeen Park.

Participants stand a chance of winning a brand-new bicycle from Ubuntu Bikes as well as safety gear and MyCiTi myconnect cards.

Date: 25 February 2018

Time: 9 AM – 2 PM

Venue: Knead Bakery, Surfer’s Corner, Beach Road, Muizenberg.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

International Childhood Cancer Day

International Childhood Cancer Day

February 15, 2018

International Childhood Cancer Day which highlights the need for concerted global actions to address the growing challenge posed by this non-communicable disease. Globally, childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases, as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

It is a day when we come together to continue the work to “Advance Cures and Transform Care” and to make childhood cancer a national and global child health priority.

 

 

Much work remains to be done. According to IARC (2015), the reported worldwide incidence of childhood cancer is increasing, from 165,000 new cases annually to 215,000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85,000 new cases for 15-19 year-olds. Many more remain uncounted and unreported due to a lack of childhood cancer registries in a large number of countries.

While the number of children with cancer is much less compared to global incidence of adult cancers, the number of lives saved is significantly higher; survival rates in high-income countries reach an average of 84% and are steadily improving even in less-resourced areas of the world where there is local and international support.

The ICCD campaign’s ultimate goal and unified message is “Advance Cures and Transform Care”. This message spotlights the inequities and glaring disparity of access to care in most low- and middle-income countries where 80% of children with cancer live. Children and adolescents in Africa, Asia and Latin America and in parts of Eastern and Southern Europe do not yet have access to appropriate treatment including essential medicines and specialized care. Currently, where one lives often determines one’s ability to survive childhood cancer.

The 188 member organizations of Childhood Cancer International (CCI) in 96 countries as the largest non-profit patient support organization for childhood cancer and the 1000 healthcare professionals from 110 countries who are members of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ask everyone to come together in solidarity to make sure children and adolescents everywhere have the chance to survive cancer and live long, productive and meaningful lives.

“The chance for a cure, the chance to live, should not be an accident of geography. There is nothing scarier than realizing that your child has cancer. However, there is nothing more tragic than knowing that treatment and cure does exist for your particular child’s cancer and with excellent outcomes, BUT… that it is not available for your child. Why? Because your child happens to live in the wrong hemisphere! It is time to take action to stop this cruel atrocity… makes your voices heard on International Childhood Cancer Day and demand from world leaders to ACT and HELP SAVE ALL CHILDREN regardless of where they live!”
(HRH Princess Dina Mired, mother of childhood cancer survivor, President-elect, UICC).

 

For the next 3 years we will build on a campaign to:

  1. Build global awareness that more than 300,000 children each year are diagnosed with cancer.
  2. Build global awareness that many types of childhood cancer are curable if given:
    • The right to early and proper diagnosis;
    • The right to access life-saving essential medicines;
    • The right to appropriate and quality medical treatments, and;
    • The right to follow up care, services and sustainable livelihood opportunities for survivors.
  3. Work towards the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 to reduce premature mortality one-third by 2030.
    • Too often when it comes to childhood cancer we are faced with a response of “but.”
    • “But” there aren’t enough children to develop new drugs;
    • “But” the treatment is too expensive;
    • “But” there aren’t enough doctors,
    • “But” …

ICCD 2018 Call to Action

The time is now. There can be no more “but.”

On July 6, 2017, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a global indicator framework for achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 2030 Global Health Targets. Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 challenges countries to: “By 2030, reduce by one-third of premature mortality from Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) through prevention and treatment, and promote mental health and well-being.” Childhood Cancer International agrees that making childhood cancer a national and global child health priority is a critical first step towards reducing premature child mortality 30 percent by 2030, providing a crucial milestone for countries to obtain this United Nation’s goal.

Childhood cancers are often curable but too many children and adolescents have no hope to overcome their disease simply because they were born in a country entrenched in poverty resulting in late diagnosis, lack of access to life-saving essential medicines and appropriate treatment.

There can be no more ‘but.’ All children in the world deserve hope for a cure – no matter where they live – not more excuses. We can no longer sweep this issue “under the rug.” Children are the future of our country and our world. Their vitality is the heartbeat of our world, a shared passion that can unite us because our future as a global community depends on it.

On International Childhood Cancer Day, all members of Childhood Cancer International stand united to make childhood cancer a national and global child health priority to ensure there are adequate resources to meet the basic rights of children with cancer. There can be no more ‘but.’ United together towards a shared vision we can advance cures, transform care, and instill hope. Together we must take action to reduce premature child cancer mortality.

Ruth Hoffman, Global President, Childhood Cancer International

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Bark 4 Bingo

Bark 4 Bingo

Don’t forget to book your spot at bingo on Saturday the 24th at the Earth Fair Market!

Tickets are selling fast and there’s only 2 weeks left until the event! All proceeds go to helping animals in desperate need, so a truly worthy cause!  It promises to be great fun with loads of prizes up for grabs, so don’t delay and book today!

Date: Saturday the 24th February 2018

Time: 18:30 – 19:00

Venue: South Palms Centre, Tokai Main Road

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

Distributed on behalf of David Pena, Valley North Neighbourhood Watch:

JOIN US FOR A MASS HIKE TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

Are you tired of the senseless violent attacks on the mountains and beaches?

Are you fed up with the criminals and perpetrators owning the mountains and beaches?

Are you tired of feeling unsafe and unable to even take a short walk into the mountains for fear of your and your family’s lives, thus being restricted to built up areas?

Do you feel for the victims and their families who have been devastated by the attacks?

We’re organising a hike up Elsie’s Peak next week Saturday 10 February, TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

The goal: To promote awareness, show solidarity for this common cause and show support for the victims of the recent attacks as well as their families.

To guarantee safety for you and your family there will be an armed response, neighbourhood watches present at the parking and on the route. SAPS will be informed of the event.

Table Mountain Security Action Group members will be present.

The established “Take Back Our Mountains” hiking group has been informed of and fully support this Elsies Peak Hike.

Bring the whole family, bring a smile and let’s enjoy the mountain the way that we are supposed to and is our right to!

We’re going to take back our mountains and beaches, one trail at a time!!

Let’s make it a big group, to make a proper statement and to break the shackles that have been placed on us!!!”

ALL WELCOME – PLEASE SHARE

When: Sat 10 Feb, 09:00

Where: Golconda Street, Glencairn Heights, Start of Elsies Peak trail.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Things to do this Valentine’s Day in Cape Town

Things to do this Valentine’s Day in Cape Town

Adore it or abhor it, you can’t escape the universal day of love. And while Valentine’s Day (14 February, for those who tend to forget) has become an age-old tradition defined by shop-bought red roses, heart-smattered teddy bears and boxes upon boxes of gooey chocolates, your personal Cupid-themed celebration doesn’t have to be quite so cliché. So, if you’re looking to spend Valentine’s Day in Cape Town (or any other amorous special occasion, for that matter), think outside the heart-shaped box and woo him or her with a truly inspired romantic escapade.

 

From incredible dinners and hotel stays to unique couples’ experiences and exclusive promos, here’s our pick of things to do this V-Day in Cape Town.

For More Information

Please note that booking is essential at each venue

SOME MORE ROMANTIC IDEAS AND EVENTS

Keep an eye out for some cool date ideas and a great selection of romantic things to do in Cape Town.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Die Oog

Die Oog

PLEASE HELP “Die Oog” In Bergvliet.

It is doomed with this drought. Please join Friends of Die Oog. Contact the admin and help in any way possible . This sanctuary was a haven for leopard toads ,the Cape Weever birds amongst plenty more -they are dying, the water is literally on rock bottom.

The thought of topping up Die Oog with water sounds good but we do need to look at in a water scarce situation where we will obtain the water from as well as checking with the Conservation Department of the city.

Die Oog is a conservation area and comprises four distinct but integrated, surviving bio diverse areas.

The Dam fills in winter, often to overflowing and the water levels fall in summer. There is a small artificial island that was built of ironstone 100 years ago.

The surrounding grassland contains shrubs and trees that provide habitat for birds. The banks of the dam consist of reeds and plants that provide valuable cover for water birds. The area has paths, benches and viewpoints of the dam and is intended for quiet recreation.

 

The granite fynbos area is situated on the eastern boundary of Die Oog and has been staked off for conservation.

Please join Friends of Die Oog we are a volunteer group and rely on a membership of R50 per annum to help maintain Die Oog.

If you are interested in joining Friends of Die Oog please email admin@dieoog.org.za

Let’s SAVE de Oog!

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

Water Saving a Worthwhile Investment in Cape Town Property

“Water saving features such as storage tanks, water efficiency devices, and boreholes in particular are unsurprisingly proving to be major selling features in Cape Town South, as property buyers are looking at the water problem as a long-term issue”, says Andre de Villiers, veteran Southern Suburbs real estate agent and owner of the Cape Town South group of four Chas Everitt offices.

“We are accordingly highlighting properties that we are marketing that feature such benefits as they definitely an attraction and we are of the opinion that for those interested in selling their property any such measures are well worth the additional investment to enhance the appeal and increase the competitive appeal and to protect one’s property value. We had a similar situation with load shedding and power saving devices not that long ago but with water-related issues there seems to be a greater value attached as it is not being seen as a temporary problem.”

“Pools are being seen as far less of an advantage and more of a hassle to be dealt with and water-wise gardens are also attracting a lot of positive discussions,” said de Villiers.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

From the City of Cape Town.

18 JANUARY 2018

STATEMENT BY THE CITY’S EXECUTIVE MAYOR PATRICIA DE LILLE

In summary:

  • Day Zero is now likely
  • 60% of Capetonians won’t save water and we must now force them
  • Punitive tariff to force high users to reduce demand
  • 50 litres per person per day for the next 150 days
  • Drought Charge likely to be scrapped by Council

We have reached a point of no return. Despite our urging for months, 60% of Capetonians are callously using more than 87 litres per day. It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero. At this point we must assume that they will not change their behaviour and that the chance of reaching Day Zero on 21 April 2018 is now very likely.

The people who are still wasting water seem to believe that Day Zero just can’t happen or that the City’s seven augmentation projects – set to produce around 200 million litres per day – will be enough to save us. This is not the case and, while our water augmentation programme will make Cape Town more water resilient in the future, it was never going to be enough to stop Day Zero.

The crisis has reached a new severity, necessitating a series of new emergency measures:

A punitive tariff

We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them. We have listened to the comments of thousands of residents asking for fairness. Council will on Friday be voting on a punitive tariff that will charge residents exponentially higher rates for water usage above 6 000 litres per month.

The table below outlines the difference between the current and the proposed punitive tariffs:

Consumption per month Current Tariffs – total household water bill New Tariff – total household water bill
6 000 litres

 

R28.44 R145.98
10 500 litres R109.50 R390.82
20 000 litres

 

R361.06 R1 536.28
35 000 litres

 

R1 050.04 R6 939.57
50 000 litres

 

R2 888.81 R20 619.57

I will personally fight to ensure that the proposed punitive tariff exempts those who are using less than 6 000 litres per month.

Provision will be made for households larger than four people to ensure that they are not unfairly penalised. We ask residents to contact the City beforehand on water@capetown.gov.za or enquire at their nearest walk-in centre.

The proposed Drought Charge is likely to be dropped after a massive outcry from Capetonians that it was unfair. I understand that response and it has personally been a tough lesson for the City. I just want you to know that the City proposed the charge because we wanted to keep delivering important and essential services during this crisis. I wanted to continue making Cape Town a city that delivers opportunities for all. We are now going to have to make deep cuts to important projects.

50 litres per day for 150 days

We will be moving to level 6B restrictions with a new limit of 50 litres per person per day to make up for the many months of missing the 500 million litre per day collective consumption target. The new restrictions will come into effect on 1 February 2018.

The new daily collective consumption target is now 450 million litres per day. This will be in place for 150 days after which the City will reassess the situation.

Level 6B restrictions will also limit irrigation using boreholes and wellpoints.

Advanced Day Zero preparation

The City has also advanced its planning for Day Zero with approximately 200 sites having been assessed. The City will be announcing everyone’s local collection points from next week so that communities can begin preparing for that eventuality.

We will also be making detailed Day Zero contingency plans available soon to answer all questions that residents and businesses might have.

In terms of the City’s work, we have been working hard to reduce demand through advanced pressure management, massively ramping up the installation of water management devices at high consumption households.  Our teams are also significantly intensifying the leak detection and repair programme, and we are rolling out education and awareness campaigns and extending our use of the treated effluent system which offsets the use of the drinking water for non-potable purposes.

Teams are working around the clock to deliver the emergency plan for desalination, groundwater and water reuse. But, as I have already said, this alone will simply not be enough to avoid Day Zero without savings from all residents.

Cape Town, this is the moment where we can bring about the fundamental behaviour change that is needed to save us all from running out of water.

The time to act for everyone’s sake is now.

So if we reduce the demand enough now, we can still get our water delivered to our houses and not have to queue daily for our allocation.

For more information

This post was sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South