Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

From the City of Cape Town.

18 JANUARY 2018


In summary:

  • Day Zero is now likely
  • 60% of Capetonians won’t save water and we must now force them
  • Punitive tariff to force high users to reduce demand
  • 50 litres per person per day for the next 150 days
  • Drought Charge likely to be scrapped by Council

We have reached a point of no return. Despite our urging for months, 60% of Capetonians are callously using more than 87 litres per day. It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero. At this point we must assume that they will not change their behaviour and that the chance of reaching Day Zero on 21 April 2018 is now very likely.

The people who are still wasting water seem to believe that Day Zero just can’t happen or that the City’s seven augmentation projects – set to produce around 200 million litres per day – will be enough to save us. This is not the case and, while our water augmentation programme will make Cape Town more water resilient in the future, it was never going to be enough to stop Day Zero.

The crisis has reached a new severity, necessitating a series of new emergency measures:

A punitive tariff

We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them. We have listened to the comments of thousands of residents asking for fairness. Council will on Friday be voting on a punitive tariff that will charge residents exponentially higher rates for water usage above 6 000 litres per month.

The table below outlines the difference between the current and the proposed punitive tariffs:

Consumption per month Current Tariffs – total household water bill New Tariff – total household water bill
6 000 litres


R28.44 R145.98
10 500 litres R109.50 R390.82
20 000 litres


R361.06 R1 536.28
35 000 litres


R1 050.04 R6 939.57
50 000 litres


R2 888.81 R20 619.57

I will personally fight to ensure that the proposed punitive tariff exempts those who are using less than 6 000 litres per month.

Provision will be made for households larger than four people to ensure that they are not unfairly penalised. We ask residents to contact the City beforehand on or enquire at their nearest walk-in centre.

The proposed Drought Charge is likely to be dropped after a massive outcry from Capetonians that it was unfair. I understand that response and it has personally been a tough lesson for the City. I just want you to know that the City proposed the charge because we wanted to keep delivering important and essential services during this crisis. I wanted to continue making Cape Town a city that delivers opportunities for all. We are now going to have to make deep cuts to important projects.

50 litres per day for 150 days

We will be moving to level 6B restrictions with a new limit of 50 litres per person per day to make up for the many months of missing the 500 million litre per day collective consumption target. The new restrictions will come into effect on 1 February 2018.

The new daily collective consumption target is now 450 million litres per day. This will be in place for 150 days after which the City will reassess the situation.

Level 6B restrictions will also limit irrigation using boreholes and wellpoints.

Advanced Day Zero preparation

The City has also advanced its planning for Day Zero with approximately 200 sites having been assessed. The City will be announcing everyone’s local collection points from next week so that communities can begin preparing for that eventuality.

We will also be making detailed Day Zero contingency plans available soon to answer all questions that residents and businesses might have.

In terms of the City’s work, we have been working hard to reduce demand through advanced pressure management, massively ramping up the installation of water management devices at high consumption households.  Our teams are also significantly intensifying the leak detection and repair programme, and we are rolling out education and awareness campaigns and extending our use of the treated effluent system which offsets the use of the drinking water for non-potable purposes.

Teams are working around the clock to deliver the emergency plan for desalination, groundwater and water reuse. But, as I have already said, this alone will simply not be enough to avoid Day Zero without savings from all residents.

Cape Town, this is the moment where we can bring about the fundamental behaviour change that is needed to save us all from running out of water.

The time to act for everyone’s sake is now.

So if we reduce the demand enough now, we can still get our water delivered to our houses and not have to queue daily for our allocation.

For more information

This post was sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


Christmas Market

Christmas Market

The most incredible setting – tucked away – in the middle of suburbia… the perfect spot to bring family and friends.. A wonderful place for children to enjoy…

We pride ourselves in offering some of the best food – a wide variety – karoo meat – potjies cooked to perfection, salad and vegan options, Mexican , Greek , Chinese , Dutch, Indian food, Sushi, Biltong – Pop Art Ice-cream, a chocolatier … freshly baked cake and Doughnuts + Belgian waffles to tantalising home-made liquors. We also have The Soap Chef – home-made creams and soaps as well as wire art and so much more…

Last year was a huge success – so coming up we are hosting our 2nd year of extended Christmas Market – 20-22nd December 2017 – and of course a special visit from Father Christmas with sing-a-long-carols. We are hosting and a New Year’s Eve Dance for the whole family – children under 12 for free… to find out more go to our facebook page and follow our weekly posts …

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town Water Crisis: What you’ll have to pay in ‘water tax’

Cape Town Water Crisis: What you’ll have to pay in ‘water tax’

Source: The South African

Date: 2017-12-05

It is all but confirmed that from February next year, Cape Town will be introducing a “water tax” or a water levy or a water surcharge. Call it whatever you will.

The purpose of the charge is to raise more capital for long-term drought solutions. But it’s also a bit of a Catch22. Since the City is generating less income from water – with everybody saving so much – they are collecting less revenue. Thus meaning less money to pay for solutions.

But just how much will you have to pay?

Let’s take a look.



Cape Town’s proposed water levy charges

Residential property value (in ZAR) Water tax (ZAR)
400k none
600k 35
800k 45
1m 50
2m 115
3m 170
4m 225
5m 280
6m 340
7m 420
10m 565
20m 1120
50m 2800

But really, if your property is valued at R4 million, we’re pretty sure you can afford the R200 a month to pay your surcharge. Weren’t you spending that on filling your pool before restrictions anyway?

The City of Cape Town is searching for an additional R1bn per year while the dams recover from the unprecedented drought conditions.

Cape Town’s water use has spiked over the last few weeks. With rainy season well and truly over and the tourist season set to begin, it’s crunch time to avoid day zero.

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Cape Town has just been voted as the best city in the world… again!

Cape Town has just been voted as the best city in the world… again!

British tourists have voted Cape Town the best city in the world for the fifth consecutive year.

After a poll of 90,000 readers in the 2017 Telegraph Travel Awards, the South African city of Cape Town was victorious, beating Vancouver and Tokyo to the top prize. Remarkably, it’s the fifth consecutive year that Cape Town has been named number one – and with all eyes on South Africa in 2018, the centenary year of Nelson Mandela’s birth, few would bet against it repeating the trick in 12 months time.

Enver Duminy for Cape Town Tourism says the recognition will aid in creating more job opportunities for locals.

“These accolades pave the way for even more innovation, entrepreneurship and job creation within the tourism sector.”

“They also accurately reflect the variety of experiences Cape Town has to offer visitors, from unparalleled natural beauty, to delicious, intimate culinary adventures in our many restaurants.”

Sporty, stylish, stunning, sociable… if Cape Town was a person, it would be that Hollywood starlet we all secretly envy. A coming-together of cultures, cuisines and landscapes, there’s nowhere quite like Cape Town, a singularly beautiful city crowned by the magnificent Table Mountain National Park.

So, whether you’re after natural scenery, or interested in indulging in the diverse food scene Cape Town offers, you won’t be let down.

Apart from the weak rand, which is making travel to South Africa very appealing to foreigners, Cape Town is only very accessible in terms of accommodation.

Cape Town currently has the 21st biggest Airbnb market in the world, and guests can stay in high profile Cape Town suburbs for a fraction of typical area prices – whilst also immersing themselves within local culture.

A high percentage of locals are also using Airbnb for staycations within SA’s borders.

For hotel stays, SA hotel prices low in comparison to other African hubs. The average rate for a hotel room in Addis Ababa is about R3 212 per night, which is more than double what guests would pay in Cape Town – an average of R1 448 per night, according to a 2015 survey.

The rest of the upper end of the ranking has a familiar look. Vancouver has played second fiddle to Cape Town for the last five editions of the awards, while Venice, Sydney and New York are perennial members of the top 10.

Here’s the full top 10 list:

  1. Cape Town
  2. Vancouver
  3. Tokyo
  4. Venice
  5. Sydney
  6. New York
  7. Seville
  8. Florence
  9. San Francisco
  10. Rome

Sources: Telegraph Travel Awards, December 3, 2017

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

What it is?
“No More Bare Feet” was established in 2016 by Mondeka Mabibini, as the second leg of the Uphawu Community Development organisation, of which she is the founder.

What’s our Aim?

The aim of the No More Bare Feet campaign is to give children in the rural areas of the Eastern Cape, where she comes from, shoes to wear to school. Many children are from poor backgrounds and their parents cannot afford to buy school shoes for them. Here poverty is dire and children have to walk up to 10km or more kilometres a day in order to get to and from school.

STBB’s involvement
With the support of national law firm STBB I Smith Tabata Buchanan Boyes, the campaign is now in its third year. All
shoes collected are distributed during the first two weeks of the school term to the schools. The vision is to motivate
or lift up the school children’s dignity and self-esteem.

How your donation helps
By donating a pair of shoes today, you:
• Make a difference to a child who walks to school barefoot over rough terrain, winter and summer;
• Instill self-esteem and confidence in the learners;
• Help build the learner’s dignity.

To those who are able to assist in this very worthy cause, either with a new pair of shoes or used shoes of any size, please drop off at any of STBB or Chas Everitt Offices.

Chas Everitt Cape Town South Office Locations:  Tokai, Bergvliet, Claremont and Fish Hoek before the 8 December 2017  (Cape Town South Chas Everitt Office locations)
STBB offices: (STBB Office locations)  before the 8 December 2017

Makes a huge difference to these kids’ lives as also to their parents and any contribution will be appreciated.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


Rally Run #2

Rally Run #2

Rally book styled TRAIL RUN – Teams of 2 or 3 pax. Teams race around a course “Route Book” ,Rally Style. A combination of greenbelt paths, horse trails, mtb tracks, vineyards and pavement. Teams have to visit strategically located checkpoints along the course. Teams have to locate and record all the check points along the route.

Duration: 1-2hrs, depending on how fast you run/not taking wrong turns etc:-)

Distance: 7-8km

Team Format: Teams of 2 or 3. It is not a relay – you stay together for the run:-)


Mixed teams
Male teams
Female teams
Entry fee: R170.00pp. Pre entries only, as we have to print/prepare the Rally books beforehand.
Date: 24 November 2017

Includes a free beer at the finish
or a glass of house wine.
Rally booklet

Below is a brief explanation of how the icons in a Rally book looks and what it means.

It’s MASSIVE fun and once you get the drift of it – you’ll LOVE this concept of running along green belts, horse trails, footpaths etc. We’ll make sure you get a proper briefing before you start your run. There is no “mass” start time. You can start any time from 17h00 – 18h30. When you ready – you go.

Bring your friends, family and colleagues!

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Community Imbizo

Community Imbizo

This event is hosted by the Diep River Community Policing Forum where we will be commemorating the start of the 16 days of Activism for gender and domestic abuse. There will be activities throughout the day and food stalls as well as organisations that deal with abuse to let the community know there are places available that can help.

Support the local community security providers as well as neighbourhood watches by buying some food from the stalls. As it is the start of the 16 days of activism, there will be companies and government departments also taking part advertising their services for the public. There will be entertainment throughout the event, snake show, fire safety display, marimba band, drumming and lots more… Please come support the Diep River CPF and SAPS.

Date: 25 November 2017

Time: 9:00–14:00

More Information


This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


Removal of alien vegetation at Wemmershoek Dam will help City save water and stretch supply

Removal of alien vegetation at Wemmershoek Dam will help City save water and stretch supply

From: City of Cape Town

Date: 15 November 2017

Today I visited the Wemmershoek Dam to view the progress made on removing alien vegetation in the catchment area. Alien vegetation around the dam and in the catchment areas uses a huge amount of water and clearing this vegetation will assist the city to conserve water that would have otherwise been used by these trees.

Over the last year, a City of Cape Town-appointed contractor has cut down over 50 hectares of pine trees from a city plantation used for commercial and industrial purposes. The remaining 110 hectares will be cleared over the next year. Removing these remaining plantations will improve stream flow into the dam and could secure an extra week or month worth of water supply for the city.

At Wemmershoek, the saving will be approximately 1 million litres per day when all pine trees are removed.

A process is now under way to ensure that we harvest the remaining plantation in a shorter period in order to minimize the potential loss of water. We will also be in contact with neighbouring land owners to ensure that the catchment area outside our boundary stays free of alien vegetation to secure a sustainable run-off into the Wemmershoek Dam.

This project forms part of our water resilience programme aimed at building up the city’s dam storage amid a persistent drought crisis.

This week dam storage levels declined by 1% to 36,8% and only 26,8% of that water is useable.

Collective water usage by the residents of Cape Town currently stands at 582 million litres per day. This is 82 million litres above the target usage of 500 million litres per day that we require to see the city through the drought.

We appreciate the water-saving efforts of Capetonians and I would like to thank Team Cape Town for their assistance. There are still many more residents and businesses that have to come on board to enhance our water-saving efforts. We can only make it through this drought with the help of each and every resident doing their part while the City works as fast as possible to bring additional supply online.

The City has implemented a successful vegetation control programme for more than 10 years and there are resources to continue the programme in the future.

As the City works on expediting all additional supply schemes, it is vital that water-saving by residents and businesses continues so that we can boost our joint efforts to beat the drought. Only by working together, will we ensure that we do not run out of water.

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town  South

Tokai Library Craft Market

Tokai Library Craft Market

Tokai Library Craft Market is a craft market that specializes in selling only handmade goodies.

You’ll find everything from jewellery, to tasty food.

If you’re looking for that special something for yourself, or as a gift, be sure to come visit our market.

The craft market is not cancelled for any reason, come rain or snow.

To book a table, call Carol on: 0731576266.

Or email:

Date: 18th November 2017

Time: 9:00–14:00

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

From: City of Cape Town  – 13 November 2017

Dam storage levels are at 36.8%, with useable water at 26.8%. Collective water usage is 582 million litres, therefore 82 million litres above the required level of 500 million litres per day.

Our dam levels have declined by 1% over the past week. This could be attributed to the high winds and hot weather which contributed to evaporation. We have managed to halve Cape Town’s water usage with the help of 51% of our water users who have put tremendous efforts into saving water. We will only get through this crisis together. To make this partnership work even more effectively, I appeal to all water users, especially the 49% who are not saving water yet, to join us all as we escalate efforts to beat this drought. Your help is vital and we need you to come on board with Team Cape Town.

This summer with the heat and wind, we can expect a steady decline going forward, so continued savings are a must. We need to do more to bring our usage down while at the same time pulling out all of the stops to ensure that we implement various projects for additional water supply to help see us through to winter 2018. Additional supply goes hand in hand with further savings.

We have looked at ways to fund a first phase of water supply projects by relooking at our spend across the City to see which non-water-related projects we can temporarily postpone while protecting funds for basic and emergency services. Internally, we have made some tough decisions and we will continue to do what is in the best interests of the people of Cape Town, no matter how difficult the challenge. We will partly be funding our first seven additional water projects with this saving and reprioritised money which comprises some R2 billion. The first phase projects earmarked for these funds are the desalination plants at Monwabisi, Strandfontein, the V&A Waterfront, and Cape Town Harbour; the Atlantis and Cape Flats Aquifer projects; and the Zandvliet water recycling project make up the first seven emergency water projects of this phase.

An online toolkit has been developed with various resources for all to use to help us to drive this message. Please see our website,, to access material that you may require. This toolkit will be updated regularly.

For information on how to meet the daily water usage requirement, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: and utilise our water calculator:

Residents can contact the City via email to for queries about the water pressure reduction, or to report contraventions of the water restrictions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts), or they can send an SMS to 31373.
This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South