Bergvliet HS Recycling Facility Closing

Bergvliet HS Recycling Facility Closing

recycle-now-logo-1024x353Request from the Tokai Residents’ Association (TRA)

We have been informed that the Bergvliet High School recycling facility is closing down this Friday, 22 April.
(Unfortunately their notice did not meet the deadline of last week’s Constantiaberg Bulletin.)

We implore Tokai residents to continue recycling responsibly.  Details of what can be recycled and nearby recycling facilities are also listed on the Waste and Recycling page of the TRA website:

If you are aware of other local recycling outlets not on this list, please advise the TRA on

Please remember that recycling has been introduced to help the environment and reduce the amount of waste going to the landfills. Small fundraising opportunities by schools have developed from this initiative but recycling staff and volunteers have limited facilities: Read more

Water Saving Tips

Cape-Town-Water-RestrictionsThe City of Cape Town is currently implementing Level 2 Water restrictions. This is due in part to the low dam levels. It is everyone’s responsibility to save water.

Here are some useful tips on how you can save water:

Save water throughout your home
  • Ensure all taps are fully closed – a dripping tap at 1 drip per second wastes up to 30 litres a day – that is equivalent to 10 000 litres a year.
  • Replace tap washers regularly and fit tap aerators to restrict and spread the flow. This saves water yet feels like you are using the same amount of water.
  • Ensure your plumbing system is regularly checked for leaks and engage a plumber when necessary.
Save water in your garden
  • Water your garden before 09:00 or after 16:00 (or even later on hot summer days). Avoid watering during windy periods and only water your garden when necessary.
  • Re-use your bath and sink water to water plants and lawns. Professional greywater recycling systems are also available for purchase.
  • If you have an overflow pipe that drips into the garden, place a bucket beneath the drips and use the saved water to water pot plants.
  • Mulching flowerbeds keeps down the weeds and holds moisture in the soil for longer.
  • Use a mulching lawn mower that allows clippings to be finely cut and blown back into the lawn.
  • Don’t mow lawns below 4 cm in length, as this reduces root depth and lawns are more likely to burn in summer.
  • Use a trigger nozzle with automatic shut-off on your hose when you wash your car, and use short bursts of water – this can save up to 300 litres each time. Or, to save even more water wash your vehicle using a bucket of water.
  • Use a trigger nozzle with automatic shut-off on your hose when you water your garden.
  • Check and maintain your irrigation system regularly, to ensure no water is running to waste, or that paved areas are being watered.
  • Adjust your irrigation system for the season and switch it off during rainy weather – even if it is borehole or wellpoint water.
  • Watering the garden less frequently, but deeper (for longer) encourages a deeper root system, which results in stronger plants. This practice can make water-wise plants out of most established plants.
Save water in your kitchen
  • Ensure washing machines or dishwashers have a full load before running them.
  • Rinse glasses, cutlery and vegetables in a basin of water, rather than under a running tap, and reuse the water for pot plants or in the garden.
  • Rinse water can be reused for the next cycle of washing up before being discarded.
  • Keep a bottle of drinking water in the fridge so that you don’t run lukewarm water down the drain when waiting for it to cool.
  • Run tap water into a bottle when waiting for it to heat up.
  • Thaw frozen foods in the fridge, sunlight or microwave rather than placing them under running water.
Save water in your bathroom
  • Close the tap when brushing your teeth. This saves up to 20 litres per month. Use a mug of water to rinse your toothbrush.
  • Plug the sink when shaving rather than rinsing your razor under running water. This saves up to 45 litres per month.
  • A half-filled bath uses about 113 litres, a 5-minute shower uses about 56 litres. Shower rather than bath, if you have to bath make it a shallow one or share it.
  • Reuse bath water in your garden.
  • Install a new water-saving toilet or put a clean, sealed plastic container filled with sand in the toilet cistern. This could save you up to 7 300 litres each year.
  • A toilet leak can waste up to 30 litres an hour – check if your toilet is leaking by adding a few drops of food dye to the cistern. If the colour seeps into the bowl, you have a leak, which should be fixed as soon as possible.
  • Install a water-saving shower head, take shorter showers, don’t run the water at full force and turn off the shower when soaping or shaving.
Save water in industries, businesses and schools
  • Automatic flushing urinals are the ultimate water wasters. If they cannot be replaced immediately, turn off the water after hours and over weekends – schools doing this have saved up to R5 000 on their annual water bill.
  • Flush valves should flush for just two to four seconds and urinals for six to eight seconds.
  • Regular maintenance of toilet fittings will save unnecessarily flushed water.
  • Ensure your plumbing systems are regularly checked for leaks.
  • Use a broom to sweep forecourts and other paved areas. Do not use a hose for this purpose.
  • Potable water must not be used to dampen building sand or other building material to prevent it from being blown away.

Original Source: Cape Town Green Map

8 Home Security Mistakes you’re Making

mistakesEvery day we make mistakes that leave our homes vulnerable to a break-in. A burglar will always choose the easiest target and that’s good news for you – it means you have a lot of influence on whether you become a victim or not.

  • Hiding keys by doorways – leaving keys near door ways is very risky as you risk someone duplicating your key and breaking in whenever they want.
  • Leaving out mail – an overflowing mailbox is a good sign that no one is home as well as it allows criminals to steal your mail and gain personal information.
  • Open windows – windows are often the easiest entry point for burglars to access your home as doors can be sturdy and deadlocked.
  • Leaving valuables in sight – valuables should be left out sight so that burglars and stored away as expensive items signal that you have money and is a clear indicator to a burglar that your home is worth targeting.
  • No visible security – securing your home with burglar bars and visible security measures is a huge deterrent to burglars.
  • Not maintaining your yard – a messy yard is a signal to a burglar that you are an easy target as untrimmed trees and hedges make for potential hiding places.
  • Updating social media – avoid using social media to let strangers know your whereabouts as you never know who is following you online.
  • A lifeless home – leaving lights and the TV / Radio on a timer can signal to a burglar that someone is home.

Download eBook: 8 Home Security Mistakes you’re Making

Resource: Cammy

Cammy is an Australian company that captures motion detected events only, saving you from searching through meaningless footage.

Level 2 water restrictions approved for Cape Town

100The City of Cape Town’s mayoral committee has approved the implementation of level 2 water restrictions.

The proposal will be deliberated at a council meeting on 10 December. The city imposes level 1 restrictions, which is a 10 percent saving at all times.

The City of Cape Town says the water restriction proposal comes because dam levels are about 15 percent lower than the norm for this time of year.

Level 2 restrictions equate to a 20 percent saving. That means residents could pay more for water.

The city says if customers reduce consumption by 10 percent, their bill should remain similar. However, if consumption stays the same, residents can expect to pay more for water if the proposal is approved by council.

Free allocations will not be affected.


– Residents may not water or irrigate their gardens between 6am and 6pm or fill up their swimming pools.

– Hose pipes may also not be used to wash cars or paved areas.

– Although water will still be available around the clock, pressure in the city’s taps will be reduced.

– If the situation worsens, more restrictions will be imposed, including supply cuts.

Source: EWN

Update: The Story of Michelle

MichelleA big thank you to everyone in our community who has commented on the story we ran on Michelle, who sells biscuits at the M3 / Tokai off-ramp (Medi Cross side) to help support her family.  Michelle has informed Lisa that so many more people smile at or acknowledge her, and that biscuit sales have gone up too – a positive outcome for which she has been so grateful.
Michelle spoke about another project she undertakes at this time of year, “Christmas for her family”.  All that it involves is trying to find old toys or clothes that she can fix up as presents for her children – Dawid 17, Bradley 14, Abigale 7, Lenita 5 and Ziva 2.  If anyone within our community has anything that you are clearing out and have a moment, please pass them on to her – she will be so happy.

The Story of Michelle

michelleThousands of commuters pass her every day in Tokai and some might pause to wonder what drives a young lady to beg at the traffic lights, come rain, come shine.

I stopped and spoke to her today, this is her story:

A will to survive against the bad luck sent her way, a will to provide for her children and disabled husband who have come to rely on her for their everything, is what drives her there. Some people will give generously and some will buy the packets of biscuits she sells for a meagre profit, but most will not look her in the eye and rather drive away.  Understandable, it’s too hard to engage with such a sad scenario and one that represents everyone’s worst fears.

A few years ago Michelle’s husband became ill and is now confined to a wheelchair – unable to do much and certainly not able to work.  They gambled everything on a move from the Free State to an easier life in the Western Cape.  Responding to an ad on Gumtree for a house to rent, they were scammed of their life savings and ended up living in a car in Sea Point – Michelle, Clive and their five children – born when times were happier and more optimistic.

People complained and of course they had to move.  From one cheap rented accommodation to another, in parts of the city that exposed them and their children to addicts, gangsters and prejudice.

With help from the community Clive applied for and now receives a disability grant and there are also benefits paid for the children, but it’s only just enough to keep a roof over their heads in yet another poor part of the city where Michelle fears daily for the safety of her children.  Whatever Michelle makes from selling her biscuits goes towards extras like food on the table, nappies and school supplies.  Some days are better than others but Michelle has also now been robbed of her cellphone – a simple luxury she cannot afford to replace.

She doesn’t want much more than to be able to provide for her children, keep them safe and ensure they finish their schooling, and feels that by selling biscuits she has raised herself above the status of ‘beggar’.  So please, if you can bring yourself to do it – engage with her, say “Hi” and give her a smile – she will thrive knowing you’ve noticed her.  Of course if you have anything to donate then please do.  But don’t ignore her – she says that’s almost the worst thing she has to endure.

Making Sense of Your Water Bill | City of Cape Town

Water_Slide_water_v1The City of Cape Town’s Water and Sanitation Department has launched a new and improved website, loaded with useful information that may assist residents, learners, students, educators and visitors.

The City is confident that the use of interactive diagrams, video clips, posters and brochures to present information in a more user-friendly way will significantly improve the experience of those visiting the Water and Sanitation Department’s new website, making it easier to access information and to interpret it.

‘For instance, by visiting residents will be able to access a detailed explanation about water tariffs and how we bill them for water usage, and how to apply for a water management device, or to be connected to the City’s water system. Selling your house? We list a few things to consider and we provide a brochure for new homeowners as well,’ says the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Utility Services, Councillor Ernest Sonnenberg.

The website is loaded with useful information for those interested in water and the way in which the City manages this scarce resource, such as:

  • how to report faults
  • how to log account enquiries
  • how to prevent sewer blockages
  • how to apply for a plumber’s licence with the City
  • tips on saving water
  • latest dam levels and historic levels, dating back to 2011
  • educational material on the Cape Town water and sanitation system
  • details of important projects that the department is working on
  • ongoing commitments to enhancing services to residents in informal settlements
  • consumer information for residents and businesses
  • by-laws and tariffs policy
  • vacancies

Read more

ICC Cricket Fixtures 2015

ICC Cricket Fixtures 2015

cricketThe Tokai blog and Chas Everitt are happy to bring you the key information for the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015, including dates and times for every fixture in Australia and New Zealand. The tournament will be jointly held across Australia and New Zealand in February and March 2015. The first matches will be played in Christchurch and Melbourne on 14 February, with the final at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 29 March.

New Load Shedding App

New Load Shedding App

load shedding appNo more confusing PDFs, no more outdated schedules that are almost as frustrating as the power outages themselves – News24 has developed a nifty app that allows you to check exactly when your neighbourhood will be hit by load shedding.

The free web application, Grid Watch allows users to type in their suburb name, and will then churn out an easy-to-understand schedule that shows when your area is set for a power outage, depending on what schedule (Schedule 1, 2, 3A, 3B) Eskom is operating on at the time.

The best part? The app will show you schedules for the next two weeks.

The news site reportedly has plans to develop the app for Android and iOS, so you can check it out on the go.


New Load Shedding Schedule

New Load Shedding Schedule

The new schedules below are designed around the days of the month and reflect Eskom’s decision to implement loadshedding nationally on a regular basis and over weekends. They replace the previous schedules, which were designed around days of the week and were applicable for occasional loadshedding during peak demand times.

Loadshedding stages depend on the extent of the shortage of generation capacity to meet the country’s electricity demand, with stage 1 being the least serious, and stage 3b being the most serious.

Loadshedding outages generally last for about 2,5 hours, with one area being affected at a time during stage 1 and four areas being affected at a time during stage 3b.

Click on image to download and print full pdf.